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Yellow Fever.

Definition of Disease Continued...

MEDICAL WAIVERS

Most countries will accept a medical waiver for persons with a medical reason for not receiving the vaccination. CDC recommends obtaining written waivers from consular or embassy officials before departure. Travelers should contact the embassy or consulate for specific advice. Typically, a physician's letter stating the reason for withholding the vaccination and written on letterhead stationery is required by the embassy or consulate. The letter should bear the stamp used by a health department or official immunization center to validate the International Certificate of Vaccination.

Yellow Fever Vaccination requirements and recommendations are given in CDC's regional travel documents, such as "Tropical South America," "West Africa," etc. A country-by-country listing of Yellow Fever Vaccination Requirements is provided in the document "Comprehensive Yellow Fever Vaccination Requirements."

YELLOW FEVER CERTIFICATE

After immunization an International Certificate of Vaccination is issued and is valid 10 days after vaccination to meet entry and exit requirements for all countries. The Certificate is good for 10 years. You must take the Certificate with you. Travelers who have a medical reason not to receive the yellow fever vaccine should obtain a medical waiver. Most countries will accept a medical waiver for persons with a medical reason not to receive the vaccine. When required, CDC recommends obtaining written waivers from consular or embassy officials before departure. A physician's letter clearly stating the medical reason not to receive the vaccine, might be acceptable to some governments. It should be written on letterhead stationery and bear the stamp used by a health department or official immunization center to validate the International Certificate of Vaccination. Check embassies or consulates for specific waiver requirements.

Travelers to Latin America should be aware of the epidemic of cholera occurring there. The majority of cases have been reported from Peru, Ecuador, Columbia, Guatemala, and Mexico. Cholera has been reported in all of Latin America except Uruguay.

Cholera cases were first recognized in Peru in the last week of January 1991 and by the end of 1995 had affected a total of over 1,000,000 people throughout countries in Latin America. Cholera has been reported in a small number of U.S. residents traveling to several Latin American countries. However, the risk of infection to the U. S. traveler is very low, especially for those who follow the usual tourist itineraries and stay in standard accommodations.


All content courtesy of the Center For Disease Control (c) 1998

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